Our new catalog 17, entirely devoted to Letterism and Inismo is now available as a pdf. It features over 100 books and zines spanning the years 1947-2014. 

If you know of somebody who might be interested in seeing this, please pass along the link!

Love, DL.

Hirschman, Jack. She Donmeh Rung [For Wallace Berman]. np: [c. 1979]. 8 1/2 x 11”, collage on found paper. Titled in holograph and signed by Hirschman using his initials at lower margin. Original collage by Hirschman made for the rare 1979 publication Frammis, which Hirschman co-edited, and which was a tribute to Wallace Berman. 

From today’s new arrivals

Guy Debord & Co. Tell Charlie Chaplin to Go Home!

1. L’Internationale Lettriste. Finis Les Pieds Plats. [Paris]: l’Internationale Lettriste, [1952]. 8 1.2 x 11”, mimeographed from typescript. Signed in plate by Serge Berna, Jean-L. Brau, Guy-Ernst Debord, and Gil WJ. Wolman. 

Perhaps the most notorious Lettriste manifesto, a salvo against Charlie Chaplin, which was distributed by hurling the leaflet out at the crowd of people attending a press conference by Chaplin on October 29, 1952. Isou took umbrage at this handbill, prompting the split amongst the party and the formation of Lettriste Internationale, which would in turn lead to the formation of the Situationist International. In the tract Chaplin is attacked for emotional blackmail and mercenary interests; as Greil Marcus points out in Lipstick Traces, the sentiment of the broadside would be echoed a few months later in Pauline Kael’s first film review. Berreby p. 147. 

From our upcoming catalog / ransom letter devoted to Lettrisme, out late this month. You’ve been warned.

Art] Byars, James Lee. Letter Proposal for a 1970 Performance. Halifax, Nova Scotia: 1970. Approximately 13 x 32” sheet of Japanese paper with feather, framed in a tripart frame with the original hand-addressed envelope. 

A letter written by Byars to his gallerist, Eugenia Butler. The envelope is addressed in Byars’ hand and addressed to her at the Butler Gallery. The letter is written in Byars’ distinctive hand in reddish gold ink, and reads as follows; G. like yr. new checks keep up the 0’s OK? Secretly install over Big J’s head photograph his face directly under it (con art?) [illegible] clients? Your gallery too? The one work could be the subject of a great review by Brenda Richardson? Up up up up up up up.” A superlative Byars letter for several reasons - it contains a proposal for a work, its from an early date (addressed from the Nova Scotia College of Art & Design), it references the art market, and the world of art criticism. 

From today’s new arrivals. More photographs and all the bibliographic niceties over at Division Leap. There’s a great sounding Byars show going on right now at MOMA / PS1, for those on the eastern seaboard. 

[Zephyrus Image] [Devo]. The Waltz. np: [Zephyrus Image], 1974. First edition. 7 1/16 x 11 3/4” broadside, linocut and letterpress. 

Perhaps the first printed work by Devo. The Waltz is one of a series of broadsides which were created by the Zephyrus Image for Kent State Creative Arts Festival, and originally issued in a folder with other broadsides, though individual copies of some of the broadsides were also printed separately. The festival was created as a reaction against the Kent State shootings, which is often cited as the formative impetus for Devo. The band’s first public performance had been at the festival the year prior, and their performance at the festival in 1974 was one of their earliest, featuring the line-up of Bob Lewis, Mark Mothersbaugh, Jim Mothersbaugh, and the Casale brothers. 

The Michael Myers bee linocut which graces this and several of the other broadsides was created in San Francisco and brought to Kent, where the broadsides were printed. Zephyrus Image were probably involved in the event due to the agency of Ed Dorn, who was on faculty at the time. The pairing of Myers’ delicate and inimitable linocut work with the quirky pathos of Devo is sublime. The text instructs the viewer to supply their own waltz rhythm as the piece is read, making it a DIY performance piece - a broadside where you, the reader, are the band. 

From today’s new arrivals. More details here

For an older piece on the entire portfolio, check out the Spineless and Stapled blog

Sanders, Ed. Fuck God in the Ass. New York: Fuck You Press, 1967. First edition. 4to, 17 pp, stab-stapled; mimeographed from typescript, holograph and drawings.

This was published the year after the raid by police on Sanders’ Peace Eye bookshop and his ensuing legal difficulties on obscenity charges - the title perhaps inspired by his obscenity battles with the authorities, and another salvo in Sanders’ all out assault on culture. This is the trade edition of 500 copies - the colophone states "Printed in 4 editions - the Trade Edition of 500 copies - The Rough Trade Edition of 10 signed & numbered copies, hardbound - The Tree Fig edition - an edition of four signed & spewd-on volumes, each containing an actual photograph of Ed Sanders coming into the oily summer crotch of an Elm tree - The Marianne Moore Fantasy Edition— an edition of three signed, numbered, boxed copies with beautiful drawings by the brilliant artisit Joe Brainard revealing the author’s secret dream fantasies of carnal union with Marianne Moore. Never in the history of Western civilization have such frank depictions of poetic polugropy been published." 

From today’s new arrivals. All the bibliographic niceties at the Division Leap website

Play-House of the Ridiculous. La MAMA etc. Presents the Play-House of the Ridiculous in Night Club, or Bubi’s Hide-Away. New York: Play-House of the Ridiculous, [1970].
Rare playbill for this lesser known production by the legendary ur-Camp theatre group, which would have an outsized influence on the development of punk and glam rock in the 70’s through their influence on the New York Dolls. Listed as performing were Warhol stars Ondine and Mary Woronov, as well as Johnny Dodd of Sinking Bear and Living Theatre fame on lights. Other performers and crew include Penny Arcade, Gillian Lola Bercowitz, Bela Box, Herndon Ely, Otto Erotica, Tecquilla, Charisma Penaje, Christina, Paul Issa, William J. P. Edgar, Joe Peroni, Marsha Dimes, Kevin Bradigan, Marie Antoinette, Sylvie Papernik, Elmer Moody, Andre Baudoin, Joyce & Jerry Marcee, Hud Son of Wolf, Frank Huntington, Robert Whitesox Schwartz, Tecquille, and last but definitely not least - music by the Irritations!
From new arrivals. More details at the Division Leap website.  Play-House of the Ridiculous. La MAMA etc. Presents the Play-House of the Ridiculous in Night Club, or Bubi’s Hide-Away. New York: Play-House of the Ridiculous, [1970].
Rare playbill for this lesser known production by the legendary ur-Camp theatre group, which would have an outsized influence on the development of punk and glam rock in the 70’s through their influence on the New York Dolls. Listed as performing were Warhol stars Ondine and Mary Woronov, as well as Johnny Dodd of Sinking Bear and Living Theatre fame on lights. Other performers and crew include Penny Arcade, Gillian Lola Bercowitz, Bela Box, Herndon Ely, Otto Erotica, Tecquilla, Charisma Penaje, Christina, Paul Issa, William J. P. Edgar, Joe Peroni, Marsha Dimes, Kevin Bradigan, Marie Antoinette, Sylvie Papernik, Elmer Moody, Andre Baudoin, Joyce & Jerry Marcee, Hud Son of Wolf, Frank Huntington, Robert Whitesox Schwartz, Tecquille, and last but definitely not least - music by the Irritations!
From new arrivals. More details at the Division Leap website.  Play-House of the Ridiculous. La MAMA etc. Presents the Play-House of the Ridiculous in Night Club, or Bubi’s Hide-Away. New York: Play-House of the Ridiculous, [1970].
Rare playbill for this lesser known production by the legendary ur-Camp theatre group, which would have an outsized influence on the development of punk and glam rock in the 70’s through their influence on the New York Dolls. Listed as performing were Warhol stars Ondine and Mary Woronov, as well as Johnny Dodd of Sinking Bear and Living Theatre fame on lights. Other performers and crew include Penny Arcade, Gillian Lola Bercowitz, Bela Box, Herndon Ely, Otto Erotica, Tecquilla, Charisma Penaje, Christina, Paul Issa, William J. P. Edgar, Joe Peroni, Marsha Dimes, Kevin Bradigan, Marie Antoinette, Sylvie Papernik, Elmer Moody, Andre Baudoin, Joyce & Jerry Marcee, Hud Son of Wolf, Frank Huntington, Robert Whitesox Schwartz, Tecquille, and last but definitely not least - music by the Irritations!
From new arrivals. More details at the Division Leap website. 

Play-House of the Ridiculous. La MAMA etc. Presents the Play-House of the Ridiculous in Night Club, or Bubi’s Hide-Away. New York: Play-House of the Ridiculous, [1970].

Rare playbill for this lesser known production by the legendary ur-Camp theatre group, which would have an outsized influence on the development of punk and glam rock in the 70’s through their influence on the New York Dolls. Listed as performing were Warhol stars Ondine and Mary Woronov, as well as Johnny Dodd of Sinking Bear and Living Theatre fame on lights. Other performers and crew include Penny Arcade, Gillian Lola Bercowitz, Bela Box, Herndon Ely, Otto Erotica, Tecquilla, Charisma Penaje, Christina, Paul Issa, William J. P. Edgar, Joe Peroni, Marsha Dimes, Kevin Bradigan, Marie Antoinette, Sylvie Papernik, Elmer Moody, Andre Baudoin, Joyce & Jerry Marcee, Hud Son of Wolf, Frank Huntington, Robert Whitesox Schwartz, Tecquille, and last but definitely not least - music by the Irritations!

From new arrivals. More details at the Division Leap website

We finally got our new postcards in. Thanks to Container Corps at YU for being the best printers in the world.  We finally got our new postcards in. Thanks to Container Corps at YU for being the best printers in the world. 

We finally got our new postcards in. Thanks to Container Corps at YU for being the best printers in the world. 

All issues published of one of the strangest, gossipiest Bay Area zines of the Mimeograph Revolution - sort of a Sinking Bear for the Bay Area set. Cow was edited by Martin Link, who was a member of the Cockettes, an associate of Helen Adam, and a lover of Jack Spicer. Each issue has it’s own separate name. The first issue is entitled Cow: The San Francisco Magazine of Livestock; the second is the “Pregnant Cow Issue”: the final issue is subtitled “The Magazine of Afro-Judeo Culture.” Issue 2 contains one of Blaser’s Nerval translations, the same translations which would eventually lead to a falling out between Duncan and Blaser, which is alluded to in a couple of other places in Cow, included the final page of the last issue, which prints “reviews” of Blaser’s book of translations, with the following note attributed to Duncan - “I’m going to re-translate ALL of Nerval”. This issue also prints a brief remembrance of Spicer by SMN. With work across the issues by Helen Adam, Doug Palmer, Deneen Brown, Larry Fagin, Harold Dull, George Stanley, Robin Blaser, J. Mac Innis, Stan Persky, Joanne Kyger, Jack Spicer, Ronnie Primack, Bill Deemer, Andrew Hoyem, Stephen Mindel, Michael Ratcliffe, H. M. Wickenheiser, Jim Semark, Gordon Gatom, Mike Hannon, Jim Thurber, Bill Brodecky, Geoff Brown, Jamie MacInnis, Luis Garcia, J. C. Alexander, Gail Dusenbery, and Hunce Voelcker. 
More information here. From our new short list devoted to Jess, Robert Duncan and their circle, which can be seen here.  All issues published of one of the strangest, gossipiest Bay Area zines of the Mimeograph Revolution - sort of a Sinking Bear for the Bay Area set. Cow was edited by Martin Link, who was a member of the Cockettes, an associate of Helen Adam, and a lover of Jack Spicer. Each issue has it’s own separate name. The first issue is entitled Cow: The San Francisco Magazine of Livestock; the second is the “Pregnant Cow Issue”: the final issue is subtitled “The Magazine of Afro-Judeo Culture.” Issue 2 contains one of Blaser’s Nerval translations, the same translations which would eventually lead to a falling out between Duncan and Blaser, which is alluded to in a couple of other places in Cow, included the final page of the last issue, which prints “reviews” of Blaser’s book of translations, with the following note attributed to Duncan - “I’m going to re-translate ALL of Nerval”. This issue also prints a brief remembrance of Spicer by SMN. With work across the issues by Helen Adam, Doug Palmer, Deneen Brown, Larry Fagin, Harold Dull, George Stanley, Robin Blaser, J. Mac Innis, Stan Persky, Joanne Kyger, Jack Spicer, Ronnie Primack, Bill Deemer, Andrew Hoyem, Stephen Mindel, Michael Ratcliffe, H. M. Wickenheiser, Jim Semark, Gordon Gatom, Mike Hannon, Jim Thurber, Bill Brodecky, Geoff Brown, Jamie MacInnis, Luis Garcia, J. C. Alexander, Gail Dusenbery, and Hunce Voelcker. 
More information here. From our new short list devoted to Jess, Robert Duncan and their circle, which can be seen here.  All issues published of one of the strangest, gossipiest Bay Area zines of the Mimeograph Revolution - sort of a Sinking Bear for the Bay Area set. Cow was edited by Martin Link, who was a member of the Cockettes, an associate of Helen Adam, and a lover of Jack Spicer. Each issue has it’s own separate name. The first issue is entitled Cow: The San Francisco Magazine of Livestock; the second is the “Pregnant Cow Issue”: the final issue is subtitled “The Magazine of Afro-Judeo Culture.” Issue 2 contains one of Blaser’s Nerval translations, the same translations which would eventually lead to a falling out between Duncan and Blaser, which is alluded to in a couple of other places in Cow, included the final page of the last issue, which prints “reviews” of Blaser’s book of translations, with the following note attributed to Duncan - “I’m going to re-translate ALL of Nerval”. This issue also prints a brief remembrance of Spicer by SMN. With work across the issues by Helen Adam, Doug Palmer, Deneen Brown, Larry Fagin, Harold Dull, George Stanley, Robin Blaser, J. Mac Innis, Stan Persky, Joanne Kyger, Jack Spicer, Ronnie Primack, Bill Deemer, Andrew Hoyem, Stephen Mindel, Michael Ratcliffe, H. M. Wickenheiser, Jim Semark, Gordon Gatom, Mike Hannon, Jim Thurber, Bill Brodecky, Geoff Brown, Jamie MacInnis, Luis Garcia, J. C. Alexander, Gail Dusenbery, and Hunce Voelcker. 
More information here. From our new short list devoted to Jess, Robert Duncan and their circle, which can be seen here.  All issues published of one of the strangest, gossipiest Bay Area zines of the Mimeograph Revolution - sort of a Sinking Bear for the Bay Area set. Cow was edited by Martin Link, who was a member of the Cockettes, an associate of Helen Adam, and a lover of Jack Spicer. Each issue has it’s own separate name. The first issue is entitled Cow: The San Francisco Magazine of Livestock; the second is the “Pregnant Cow Issue”: the final issue is subtitled “The Magazine of Afro-Judeo Culture.” Issue 2 contains one of Blaser’s Nerval translations, the same translations which would eventually lead to a falling out between Duncan and Blaser, which is alluded to in a couple of other places in Cow, included the final page of the last issue, which prints “reviews” of Blaser’s book of translations, with the following note attributed to Duncan - “I’m going to re-translate ALL of Nerval”. This issue also prints a brief remembrance of Spicer by SMN. With work across the issues by Helen Adam, Doug Palmer, Deneen Brown, Larry Fagin, Harold Dull, George Stanley, Robin Blaser, J. Mac Innis, Stan Persky, Joanne Kyger, Jack Spicer, Ronnie Primack, Bill Deemer, Andrew Hoyem, Stephen Mindel, Michael Ratcliffe, H. M. Wickenheiser, Jim Semark, Gordon Gatom, Mike Hannon, Jim Thurber, Bill Brodecky, Geoff Brown, Jamie MacInnis, Luis Garcia, J. C. Alexander, Gail Dusenbery, and Hunce Voelcker. 
More information here. From our new short list devoted to Jess, Robert Duncan and their circle, which can be seen here. 

All issues published of one of the strangest, gossipiest Bay Area zines of the Mimeograph Revolution - sort of a Sinking Bear for the Bay Area set. Cow was edited by Martin Link, who was a member of the Cockettes, an associate of Helen Adam, and a lover of Jack Spicer. Each issue has it’s own separate name. The first issue is entitled Cow: The San Francisco Magazine of Livestock; the second is the “Pregnant Cow Issue”: the final issue is subtitled “The Magazine of Afro-Judeo Culture.” Issue 2 contains one of Blaser’s Nerval translations, the same translations which would eventually lead to a falling out between Duncan and Blaser, which is alluded to in a couple of other places in Cow, included the final page of the last issue, which prints “reviews” of Blaser’s book of translations, with the following note attributed to Duncan - “I’m going to re-translate ALL of Nerval”. This issue also prints a brief remembrance of Spicer by SMN. With work across the issues by Helen Adam, Doug Palmer, Deneen Brown, Larry Fagin, Harold Dull, George Stanley, Robin Blaser, J. Mac Innis, Stan Persky, Joanne Kyger, Jack Spicer, Ronnie Primack, Bill Deemer, Andrew Hoyem, Stephen Mindel, Michael Ratcliffe, H. M. Wickenheiser, Jim Semark, Gordon Gatom, Mike Hannon, Jim Thurber, Bill Brodecky, Geoff Brown, Jamie MacInnis, Luis Garcia, J. C. Alexander, Gail Dusenbery, and Hunce Voelcker. 

More information here. From our new short list devoted to Jess, Robert Duncan and their circle, which can be seen here. 

Jess. Untitled Drawing. 1950.

From our newest short list of art and publications from the San Francisco Renaissance, out today.