Division Leap is excited to announce our latest publication, House Music - a collaboration between Portland poets James Yeary and Sam Lohmann, out late but just in time for their trip east for the Brooklyn Poetry Summit. The form of the book is a homage to the New York School collaborations of Ted Berrigan and Joe Brainard. One of 300 copies printed by hand on a beat HP 8100 and stab-stapled, of course. Come by the shop to pick one up, or it can be ordered at the DL website here.  Division Leap is excited to announce our latest publication, House Music - a collaboration between Portland poets James Yeary and Sam Lohmann, out late but just in time for their trip east for the Brooklyn Poetry Summit. The form of the book is a homage to the New York School collaborations of Ted Berrigan and Joe Brainard. One of 300 copies printed by hand on a beat HP 8100 and stab-stapled, of course. Come by the shop to pick one up, or it can be ordered at the DL website here.  Division Leap is excited to announce our latest publication, House Music - a collaboration between Portland poets James Yeary and Sam Lohmann, out late but just in time for their trip east for the Brooklyn Poetry Summit. The form of the book is a homage to the New York School collaborations of Ted Berrigan and Joe Brainard. One of 300 copies printed by hand on a beat HP 8100 and stab-stapled, of course. Come by the shop to pick one up, or it can be ordered at the DL website here.  Division Leap is excited to announce our latest publication, House Music - a collaboration between Portland poets James Yeary and Sam Lohmann, out late but just in time for their trip east for the Brooklyn Poetry Summit. The form of the book is a homage to the New York School collaborations of Ted Berrigan and Joe Brainard. One of 300 copies printed by hand on a beat HP 8100 and stab-stapled, of course. Come by the shop to pick one up, or it can be ordered at the DL website here. 

Division Leap is excited to announce our latest publication, House Music - a collaboration between Portland poets James Yeary and Sam Lohmann, out late but just in time for their trip east for the Brooklyn Poetry Summit. The form of the book is a homage to the New York School collaborations of Ted Berrigan and Joe Brainard. One of 300 copies printed by hand on a beat HP 8100 and stab-stapled, of course. Come by the shop to pick one up, or it can be ordered at the DL website here

Two different copies of the fourth issue of C: A Volume of Poetry, Vol. 1 No. 4, infamous for their covers by Andy Warhol - probably his first silkscreens from a polaroid, portraits of Edwin Denby and Gerard Malanga. 
The cover image shows Denby seated, with Malanga standing behind him; the rear wrap reproduces a subsequent photograph of Malanga kissing Denby. The circumstances of the creation of this issue are examined in minute detail in Wolf, who makes a case that this is the first known Warhol silkscreen from a polaroid. 
Warhol was deeply fascinated by the downtown poetry scenes, and went to great lengths to insinuate himself among the poets. The serial nature of much of his later artwork was heavily influenced by the little poetry magazines coming out of New York City at that time, and this two part image, bracketing the mimeographed pages of this fourth issue of C, is the central artifact of that relationship.
The first copy is the nicest impression we’ve seen, and we suspect that it is one of the earliest impressions of the screenprint; the last is certainly the worst we’ve ever seen, in stark contrast and twisted detail, yet somehow our favorite. 
From today’s new arrivals at Division Leap. More details here and here.  Two different copies of the fourth issue of C: A Volume of Poetry, Vol. 1 No. 4, infamous for their covers by Andy Warhol - probably his first silkscreens from a polaroid, portraits of Edwin Denby and Gerard Malanga. 
The cover image shows Denby seated, with Malanga standing behind him; the rear wrap reproduces a subsequent photograph of Malanga kissing Denby. The circumstances of the creation of this issue are examined in minute detail in Wolf, who makes a case that this is the first known Warhol silkscreen from a polaroid. 
Warhol was deeply fascinated by the downtown poetry scenes, and went to great lengths to insinuate himself among the poets. The serial nature of much of his later artwork was heavily influenced by the little poetry magazines coming out of New York City at that time, and this two part image, bracketing the mimeographed pages of this fourth issue of C, is the central artifact of that relationship.
The first copy is the nicest impression we’ve seen, and we suspect that it is one of the earliest impressions of the screenprint; the last is certainly the worst we’ve ever seen, in stark contrast and twisted detail, yet somehow our favorite. 
From today’s new arrivals at Division Leap. More details here and here.  Two different copies of the fourth issue of C: A Volume of Poetry, Vol. 1 No. 4, infamous for their covers by Andy Warhol - probably his first silkscreens from a polaroid, portraits of Edwin Denby and Gerard Malanga. 
The cover image shows Denby seated, with Malanga standing behind him; the rear wrap reproduces a subsequent photograph of Malanga kissing Denby. The circumstances of the creation of this issue are examined in minute detail in Wolf, who makes a case that this is the first known Warhol silkscreen from a polaroid. 
Warhol was deeply fascinated by the downtown poetry scenes, and went to great lengths to insinuate himself among the poets. The serial nature of much of his later artwork was heavily influenced by the little poetry magazines coming out of New York City at that time, and this two part image, bracketing the mimeographed pages of this fourth issue of C, is the central artifact of that relationship.
The first copy is the nicest impression we’ve seen, and we suspect that it is one of the earliest impressions of the screenprint; the last is certainly the worst we’ve ever seen, in stark contrast and twisted detail, yet somehow our favorite. 
From today’s new arrivals at Division Leap. More details here and here.  Two different copies of the fourth issue of C: A Volume of Poetry, Vol. 1 No. 4, infamous for their covers by Andy Warhol - probably his first silkscreens from a polaroid, portraits of Edwin Denby and Gerard Malanga. 
The cover image shows Denby seated, with Malanga standing behind him; the rear wrap reproduces a subsequent photograph of Malanga kissing Denby. The circumstances of the creation of this issue are examined in minute detail in Wolf, who makes a case that this is the first known Warhol silkscreen from a polaroid. 
Warhol was deeply fascinated by the downtown poetry scenes, and went to great lengths to insinuate himself among the poets. The serial nature of much of his later artwork was heavily influenced by the little poetry magazines coming out of New York City at that time, and this two part image, bracketing the mimeographed pages of this fourth issue of C, is the central artifact of that relationship.
The first copy is the nicest impression we’ve seen, and we suspect that it is one of the earliest impressions of the screenprint; the last is certainly the worst we’ve ever seen, in stark contrast and twisted detail, yet somehow our favorite. 
From today’s new arrivals at Division Leap. More details here and here. 

Two different copies of the fourth issue of C: A Volume of Poetry, Vol. 1 No. 4, infamous for their covers by Andy Warhol - probably his first silkscreens from a polaroid, portraits of Edwin Denby and Gerard Malanga.

The cover image shows Denby seated, with Malanga standing behind him; the rear wrap reproduces a subsequent photograph of Malanga kissing Denby. The circumstances of the creation of this issue are examined in minute detail in Wolf, who makes a case that this is the first known Warhol silkscreen from a polaroid.

Warhol was deeply fascinated by the downtown poetry scenes, and went to great lengths to insinuate himself among the poets. The serial nature of much of his later artwork was heavily influenced by the little poetry magazines coming out of New York City at that time, and this two part image, bracketing the mimeographed pages of this fourth issue of C, is the central artifact of that relationship.

The first copy is the nicest impression we’ve seen, and we suspect that it is one of the earliest impressions of the screenprint; the last is certainly the worst we’ve ever seen, in stark contrast and twisted detail, yet somehow our favorite. 

From today’s new arrivals at Division Leap. More details here and here

Maclise, Angus. Year. NY: Dead Language Press, 1961. 
An early book from Piero Heliczer’s Dead Language Press, and my favorite book by Maclise -  a shamanic ordering of days which became an important organizational structure for Maclise and other members of the Theatre of Eternal Music. 
From new arrivals at Division Leap. More information here. According to Maclise, catalogued on The Day of the High Road.  Maclise, Angus. Year. NY: Dead Language Press, 1961. 
An early book from Piero Heliczer’s Dead Language Press, and my favorite book by Maclise -  a shamanic ordering of days which became an important organizational structure for Maclise and other members of the Theatre of Eternal Music. 
From new arrivals at Division Leap. More information here. According to Maclise, catalogued on The Day of the High Road.  Maclise, Angus. Year. NY: Dead Language Press, 1961. 
An early book from Piero Heliczer’s Dead Language Press, and my favorite book by Maclise -  a shamanic ordering of days which became an important organizational structure for Maclise and other members of the Theatre of Eternal Music. 
From new arrivals at Division Leap. More information here. According to Maclise, catalogued on The Day of the High Road. 

Maclise, Angus. Year. NY: Dead Language Press, 1961. 

An early book from Piero Heliczer’s Dead Language Press, and my favorite book by Maclise -  a shamanic ordering of days which became an important organizational structure for Maclise and other members of the Theatre of Eternal Music. 

From new arrivals at Division Leap. More information here. According to Maclise, catalogued on The Day of the High Road. 

A rare promotional poster by The Incredible Bruce Conner for his great, early film Cosmic Ray. The poster came to us housed in an envelope with a letter from Conner on his stationary, which, if you were wondering, is printed with the legend “The Incredible Bruce Conner”. All we can do is agree. 
From today’s new arrivals. All the fetishistic details here. The sun is out and we are cataloguing on the loading dock.  A rare promotional poster by The Incredible Bruce Conner for his great, early film Cosmic Ray. The poster came to us housed in an envelope with a letter from Conner on his stationary, which, if you were wondering, is printed with the legend “The Incredible Bruce Conner”. All we can do is agree. 
From today’s new arrivals. All the fetishistic details here. The sun is out and we are cataloguing on the loading dock.  A rare promotional poster by The Incredible Bruce Conner for his great, early film Cosmic Ray. The poster came to us housed in an envelope with a letter from Conner on his stationary, which, if you were wondering, is printed with the legend “The Incredible Bruce Conner”. All we can do is agree. 
From today’s new arrivals. All the fetishistic details here. The sun is out and we are cataloguing on the loading dock. 

A rare promotional poster by The Incredible Bruce Conner for his great, early film Cosmic Ray. The poster came to us housed in an envelope with a letter from Conner on his stationary, which, if you were wondering, is printed with the legend “The Incredible Bruce Conner”. All we can do is agree. 

From today’s new arrivals. All the fetishistic details here. The sun is out and we are cataloguing on the loading dock. 

Piero Heliczer. The Collected Plays Vol. III Harunobu The Blue Centaur Bessie Smith.
Paris: The Dead Language Press, 1971. First and only printing, one of only 100 copies. 
One of the rarest productions from Heliczer’s Dead Language Press. In addition to printing three of HeliczerÕs ludic, surrealist plays, it prints an interview with Piero by Terry Ork, lists prior Dead Language publications, and also an intriguing list of material which the press distributed, as well as a list of film which the Paris Filmmaker’s Cooperative distributed, including films by Warhol, Malanga, Brakhage, etc. 
Perhaps most intriguing, however, the performance notes for Blue Centaur include a character named Angus, described as such: “Angus should be immediately singular though he is only nineteen preferably for example very tall and lank he carries books with nyu covers” - a character I think must certainly be based on Heliczer’s close friend Angus Maclise, who studied geology at NYU - the two were friends as far back as high school, and collaborated on many projects together under the Dead Language imprint. 
From new arrivals. DL loves the DL. More info here.  Piero Heliczer. The Collected Plays Vol. III Harunobu The Blue Centaur Bessie Smith.
Paris: The Dead Language Press, 1971. First and only printing, one of only 100 copies. 
One of the rarest productions from Heliczer’s Dead Language Press. In addition to printing three of HeliczerÕs ludic, surrealist plays, it prints an interview with Piero by Terry Ork, lists prior Dead Language publications, and also an intriguing list of material which the press distributed, as well as a list of film which the Paris Filmmaker’s Cooperative distributed, including films by Warhol, Malanga, Brakhage, etc. 
Perhaps most intriguing, however, the performance notes for Blue Centaur include a character named Angus, described as such: “Angus should be immediately singular though he is only nineteen preferably for example very tall and lank he carries books with nyu covers” - a character I think must certainly be based on Heliczer’s close friend Angus Maclise, who studied geology at NYU - the two were friends as far back as high school, and collaborated on many projects together under the Dead Language imprint. 
From new arrivals. DL loves the DL. More info here. 

Piero Heliczer. The Collected Plays Vol. III Harunobu The Blue Centaur Bessie Smith.

Paris: The Dead Language Press, 1971. First and only printing, one of only 100 copies. 

One of the rarest productions from Heliczer’s Dead Language Press. In addition to printing three of HeliczerÕs ludic, surrealist plays, it prints an interview with Piero by Terry Ork, lists prior Dead Language publications, and also an intriguing list of material which the press distributed, as well as a list of film which the Paris Filmmaker’s Cooperative distributed, including films by Warhol, Malanga, Brakhage, etc.

Perhaps most intriguing, however, the performance notes for Blue Centaur include a character named Angus, described as such: “Angus should be immediately singular though he is only nineteen preferably for example very tall and lank he carries books with nyu covers” - a character I think must certainly be based on Heliczer’s close friend Angus Maclise, who studied geology at NYU - the two were friends as far back as high school, and collaborated on many projects together under the Dead Language imprint. 

From new arrivals. DL loves the DL. More info here

If you’ve ever had the desire to see a non-metaphorical New York School gang bang, look no further. This is your poster. 

Single sheet, approximately 22 x 16”, printed on recto and reproducing a black and white drawing by George Schneeman of participants in that year’s New Year’s Day Reading engaged in a Boschean Orgy. The downtown scene as a beast with a hundred backs!. See Ted Berrigan embracing Anne Waldman while being fellated by Maggie Dubris! Larry Rivers and Elinor Nauen as a single hermaphrodite! And what is M. J. Becker doing to Joe Brainard?

One of our favorite Schneeman posters, and our favorite of the many great posters which were made for the long-running series of New Year’s Day readings at the Poetry Project, which is holding it’s 40th anniversary reading as I type. 

From new arrivals. More details, as always, at the Division Leap website here. Happy New Year!

We just got copies of the new chapbook Little Advantages by Paul Maziar, out on Chris Ashby’s Couch Press, and the entire Division Leap staff is reading it. Great stuff, one of my favorite books of Portland poetry this year. The book looks great as well, with wraparound cover art by Will Bruno. One of 90 numbered copies.  It can be ordered at the Division Leap website here.   We just got copies of the new chapbook Little Advantages by Paul Maziar, out on Chris Ashby’s Couch Press, and the entire Division Leap staff is reading it. Great stuff, one of my favorite books of Portland poetry this year. The book looks great as well, with wraparound cover art by Will Bruno. One of 90 numbered copies.  It can be ordered at the Division Leap website here.   We just got copies of the new chapbook Little Advantages by Paul Maziar, out on Chris Ashby’s Couch Press, and the entire Division Leap staff is reading it. Great stuff, one of my favorite books of Portland poetry this year. The book looks great as well, with wraparound cover art by Will Bruno. One of 90 numbered copies.  It can be ordered at the Division Leap website here.  

We just got copies of the new chapbook Little Advantages by Paul Maziar, out on Chris Ashby’s Couch Press, and the entire Division Leap staff is reading it. Great stuff, one of my favorite books of Portland poetry this year. The book looks great as well, with wraparound cover art by Will Bruno. One of 90 numbered copies.  It can be ordered at the Division Leap website here.  

Moscoso, Victor [Richard Brautigan]. Handbill for the Invisible Circus. 

San Francisco: The Diggers, 1967. 

5”x7”, single sheet. Announcement for “The Invisible Circus, a 72 Hour Community, presented by Artist Liberation Front - Diggers - Glide Foundation,” which took place at the Glide Church, February 24-26, 1967. On behalf of the Diggers, “Richard [Brautigan] phoned Victor Moscoso and asked him to do a poster for the event. Any job for the Diggers was a donation, and Moscoso, currently working in color, scaled back his palette. He selected a black-and-white picture from an art book on surrealism and painted the lettering above it in a single evening. To Charles Perry, the image on Moscoso’s small handbill looked like ‘a human being with a rubber eraser as a face’” (William Hjortsberg, “Jubilee Hitchhiker,” p. 295). 

The event was cut short following sex on the altar. The event was also a watershed moment in the increasing speed of print communication in the underground as Brautigan and the Diggers set up a mimeograph machine and began running off broadsides in real time, just as the New York Motherfuckers would do that year in protest during community meetings with Bill Graham regarding the free use of the Fillmore East. 

From today’s new arrivals. More information at the Division Leap website, www.divisionleap.com. No sex or altars at Division Leap this morning, but the sun is finally out…

Nam June Paik. please, return the fish (inside) to water. 
\n.p.: Nam June Paik, [1969]. First edition. Black lithograph print on paper, affixed to white envelope containing a small dried fish.
A scarce and unusual Fluxus multiple. There appear to be two states, one bearing the title “Liberation Sonata for Fish” in addition to instructions, which appears to be the more common state. This example, which we haven’t seen before, is similar to the Walker Art Center copy from Paik’s archive. According to the Walker Art Center’s catalog entry, these envelopes were handed out at the 7th Annual NY Festival of the Avant-Garde in Wards Island, New York.
From today’s new arrivals. More details at our website here. Inquiries: info@divisionleap.com.
Catalogued by Sam. The Division Leap staff would also like to get back to the river.  Nam June Paik. please, return the fish (inside) to water. 
\n.p.: Nam June Paik, [1969]. First edition. Black lithograph print on paper, affixed to white envelope containing a small dried fish.
A scarce and unusual Fluxus multiple. There appear to be two states, one bearing the title “Liberation Sonata for Fish” in addition to instructions, which appears to be the more common state. This example, which we haven’t seen before, is similar to the Walker Art Center copy from Paik’s archive. According to the Walker Art Center’s catalog entry, these envelopes were handed out at the 7th Annual NY Festival of the Avant-Garde in Wards Island, New York.
From today’s new arrivals. More details at our website here. Inquiries: info@divisionleap.com.
Catalogued by Sam. The Division Leap staff would also like to get back to the river. 

Nam June Paik. please, return the fish (inside) to water. 

\n.p.: Nam June Paik, [1969]. First edition. Black lithograph print on paper, affixed to white envelope containing a small dried fish.

A scarce and unusual Fluxus multiple. There appear to be two states, one bearing the title “Liberation Sonata for Fish” in addition to instructions, which appears to be the more common state. This example, which we haven’t seen before, is similar to the Walker Art Center copy from Paik’s archive. According to the Walker Art Center’s catalog entry, these envelopes were handed out at the 7th Annual NY Festival of the Avant-Garde in Wards Island, New York.

From today’s new arrivals. More details at our website here. Inquiries: info@divisionleap.com.

Catalogued by Sam. The Division Leap staff would also like to get back to the river.